The Red shoes A Technicolor masterpiece

The Red shoes A Technicolor masterpiece

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In this classic drama, Vicky Page (Moira Shearer) is an aspiring ballerina torn between her dedication to dance and her desire to love. While her imperious instructor, Boris Lermontov (Anton Walbrook), urges to her to forget anything but ballet, Vicky begins to fall for the charming young composer Julian Craster (Marius Goring). Eventually Vicky, under great emotional stress, must choose to pursue either her art or her romance, a decision that carries serious consequences. The Red Shoes, the singular fantasia from Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, is cinema’s quintessential backstage drama, as well as one of the most glorious Technicolor feasts ever concocted for the screen.

Today i am going to talk about the red shoes.
I often list the red shoes among the best noir movies all time in my eyes as the movie is considered noir as it’s a backstage dance movie with such depths of darkness. I really do admire Jack Cardiff’s work on this movie. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s The Red Shoes is really spearheaded the notion of modus operandi with a harmony of visuals elements and aural elements, the British filmmaking partners known as The Archers embrace ballet in a very rich Technicolor feast on the eyes.

redshoes-sketch

One of Hein Heckroth’s sketches for The Red Shoes ballet. This scene is one of the many collective scenes that is really a collective reflection of the mind of the dancer at time of the scene. She is very driven to an insane level to be dancer to perfect level that goes to levels of insanity.

The grotesque aspect combined with the style of the 1940’s makes this collective scene a nightmarish reflection. nightmarish images of the night remind of lost dreams that come back to haunt the viewers with jack’s richly detailed. Vicky the lead character is playing into the dance of the red shoes as she is dancing into madness. It is Vicky’s obsession. She does not understand life at all. She does not get anything beside to dance as her life is centered on dance. Her obsession on dance is insanity levels of madness. She is mad and crazy. I would say she has an obsessive personality.

Vicky’s possession by art transforms her from an aspiring performer to an accomplished dancer, until she transmigrates into something else altogether as she is driven by her  obsessive personality to madness. an unhinged vessel seized by art, thrust into a nightmare world from which there is no escape until her death in the finale. It really is also because of the others around her keep pushing to perfection it drives on her obsessive personality to the point of no return which ends up with her death on the stage.

If not for the mystical possession of Vicky by her art, the story could be mistaken for pure melodrama; but the indefinable miracles in even Powell and Pressburger’s most modest, seemingly realist works provide an element of fantasy. In its simultaneous realist and fanciful approaches, where the back-stage activities are examined while the ballet sequence uses an array of filmmaking techniques to astound the audience with its magic, The Red Shoes has been considered at war with itself as the movie shows her at conflict with herself and her obsessive need. It is her collective madness that does make it far more than a melodrama that turns it to noir levels of darkness that mirrors Andersen’s original story to a tee.

The ballet moves from a typical stage setting to Heckroth’s surrealist painted backdrops, into a world where a church of dramatically elongated shapes. Vicky’s character moves because the red shoes compel her to and because the twisted shoemaker (Massine) controls them like a puppeteer. Notice how the red shoes tie themselves into onto Vicky’s feet, or how all at once Vicky sees the ballet’s shoemaker character as both Lermontov and Julian, both her puppeteers in life. She is very much a puppet being played to perfection by those around her.  The sequence is as much a voyage into Vicky’s mind as it is a rendering of the ballet. Her dancing travels beyond space and time to engage the imagination, flowing together with a flawless unity of music and image. This colorful, limitless universe is where Vicky exists when she dances as we see her to a point of madness that leads to her death.

The Red Shoes, if anything, is accessible to a general audience; even the most cynical viewer cannot help but find themselves dazzled by the beauty of the production and the haunting nature of the narrative about a dancer driven to point of death because of her obsessive need to be a wonderful dancer. The red shoes captures Andersen’s original story  of the red shoes perfectly.

The plot combines Hans Christian Andersen elements with with elements of Dyagilev’s relationships with Nizhinskii and Myasin, and the effect of the younger men’s marriages. Dancer Vicky Page (Shearer) and composer Julian Craster (Goring) are taken up and encouraged by ballet impresario Boris Lermontov (Walbrook). It’s very powerful as it does build upon the elements to give us some rich depth to this idea. It’s very gripping and engaging. It’s interesting as this classic molds together the classic tales of Hans Christian Andersen in a surreal manner that’s a tribute to many classic tales as its very bold and surreal.

The story’s passion for ballet across to the audience. The story is and fascinating, due to the way it is told. The acting is outstanding as ever. The acting by Anton Walbrook, Marius Goring and Moira Shearer are outstanding as they all bring brilliance to the film. The music conducted flawlessly by Sir Thomas Beecham is a bold stand out. The music is just as outstanding as ever. It will stay with you as it does not move along the beats of the story it helps drive it home as it’s very powerful. The ballets shown are magnificently staged. The Red Shoes ballet by Sir Robert Helpmann and The Shoemaker by Leonide Massine, a giant in the world of ballet. His ballet is just outstanding in this classic gem.

The acting of everyone in the cast is really wonderful as ever. I would say Moira Shearer gives us one of finest performances all time. Marius Goring gives such a fine performance. Anton Walbrook gives us one of his finest hours. It is a wonderfully acted movie that really captures the rich wonders of ballet.

Brian Easdale’s musical score really captures the world of ballet to such Dramatic levels of depth. Its richly layered musical score is one of the finest of the golden age. It is a richly detailed musical score that captures the contrasts and layers of this movie.

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s The Red Shoes is a wonder of  art. It will leave dazzled.The Archers team of Powell and Pressburger aimed high with ‘The Red Shoes’ and scored a bull’s-eye. The film is a feast for the senses: cinematography by Archers regular Jack Cardiff, music, acting and ballet are combined together to make this a truly outstanding classic in every regard. So everyone watch this movie today as it’s simply outstanding as ever. I hope you enjoyed talk about this amazing movie. I was trying address why this movie is masterpiece and considered one of the finest movies ever made.

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