The Devil and Miss Jones

The Devil and Miss Jones

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TODAY i talk about The Devil and Miss Jones. It is the screwball comedy classic that frankly stands among the classics. It stars one of my favorite actresses of the golden age Jean Arthur whom frank Capra called the gem of the screen.  It is a requested review by a friend on facebook named Mike Dirienzo. So thanks so much to him for this wonderful choice. so to begin this this review.

The Devil and Miss Jones review

J.P. Merrick (Charles Coburn) is a very rich and very grumpy department store owner. When his employees decide to start unionizing, hoping to get higher pay and better conditions in the workplace, he decides to take action to stop them. Determined to find and take down the union organizers, J.P. takes a job in his own store as a shoe salesman under the name of “Mr. Higgins.”  but soon finds their grievances are genuine through Miss Jones, Merrick’s co-worker and O’Brien’s girlfriend. Eventually, Merrick leads the fight for decent rights and also finds a girl of his own. (plot form goggle)

Sam Wood (Goodbye, Mr. Chips) directs 1941’s The Devil and Miss Jones, a romantic dramedy written by Norman Krasna (Indiscreet). Charles Coburn- jean Arthur-Robert Cummings and Spring Byington stars in this comedy classic with one of my favorite intros of any classic movie, The image of a good jean contrasted to the image of Charles Coburn as the devil is just such a delight to see.

Jean Arthur really shines wonderfully in her role. She makes the role as much driven by her very strong witty charming acting and her dramatic acting. She truly does give us among her finest of hours. It may be next to Mr. Smith Goes to Washington as one of her finest roles i ever seen her play on the screen.

Charles Coburn truly shines in his role. He starred alongside jean in a few movies each of them he always matches her greatly as he feels perfectly cast in each role. He is truly a wonderful actor that always feels so charming to watch on the screen. Robert Cummings may be very much the perfect Joe as he truly makes its feel very much like the every-man in the movie. He truly is wonderful in his respective role.

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Spring Byington plays a truly wonderful role. Charles Coburn stands out. His character makes the greatest personal journey from disgruntled and closed-minded to happy and loving and willing to compromise as we see by end of the movie.  Jean Arthur is also a stand-out. She lights up the screen with her natural charm and bright personality.

The subplot of union’s organization drama drives the plot forward. It’s the sharp wit and charm of its cast that brings out the magic of this wonderful gem which in part is Sam Wood’s inspired direction that brings home the magic of this special comedy classic.This comedy has a moral depth to it that is a rarity in the genre of comedy.  Jean is truly the queen of dramedy. Frank Capra was right she was jewel indeed for all ages.  It is a must see for any one that loves a good screwball comedy or a movie lover as this movie will always delight you anytime you see it.

The Ruth rating:five bette's

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4 thoughts on “The Devil and Miss Jones

  1. Sarah Godwin says:

    To say that I love this film is putting it mildly!! It’s so much fun to watch with a stellar cast of Jean Arthur, Charles Coburn, Robert Cummings, and Spring Byington!! If you love comedy as I do, you will really enjoy this film about a department store owner trying to outwit his employees (who want a well deserved raise) by becoming an employee under an assumed name. Then the fun begins!!

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