Invaders form mars

Invaders form mars review

William Cameron Menzies’ frightening portrayal of a Martian menace is blessed with his own fantastic production design, brilliantly weaving a world from a child’s perspective as this fun b-movie is fades form memory as i review this movie also the 1986 remake as also i do a modern remake of it with mar’s attacks all three movies really are the mar’s invading us idea given to us in each a differnt way as the 1950’s era was a ripe era for scfi b-movie as such given on on the Forbidden Planet DVD we see watch the skies which talks about how it was about the fears of the time. So i begin b-movie month with my frist b-movie review of this month.

Invaders From Mars (1953) | Sci-Fi Saturdays

Invaders from Mars has a simple setup, but is executed with such precision and strong performances that it goes above and beyond the expected alien invader scenario as the simple story is really such a deeper story beyond the core simple idea of aliens landing to invade our planet. a young boy named David. When he wakes the next day he notices that his father has a wound on his neck and is acting strange. After noticing the same mark on other townsfolk he realises that they’ve been taken over by Martians. He then has to try and convince the local authorities of his inherently outlandish tale and put a stop to the menacing Martians but its so much fun to watch it unfold on screen with such wonderful performances as we see it form a child’s outlook of the invasion of mars. It really plays on the fears of the 1950’s as we see this movie play upon the fear of the other which was a common idea for this era of movie. 

Low angles make adults appear as giants, while the mutant Martians seem even more imposing and a multitude of adept tracking shots bring the whole thing to vivid, alarming life, due in no small part to John F. Seitz’ wonderful cinematography. Even the production design becomes more nightmarish as it goes on (again by Menzies himself who had a long and successful career in that area with films like Gone With The Wind), where innocuous locations like the rooms of David’s house and the trees behind it gradually become more alien. It’s not just the alien menace or the humans in their control, the very world around him is threatening now. It’s that dreamlike quality that really sets Invaders From Mars apart. That unearthly green glow that bathes the Martian spaceship, the newly twisted and warped trees that surround it, the malevolent but ethereal sound design as the aliens capture new victims, it all feels like one big hallucination or nightmare, a hazy fever dream of the end of the world as this mvoie showcases some of the best of the b-movie of this era as its a fun classic you will enjoy so much to watch unfold on the screen.

Invaders From Mars (1986) remake review

Tobe Hooper’s Invaders from Mars is  A remake of William Cameron Menzies’ 1953 science-fiction/horror classic which was scary remake of it i might add as this movie really pumps up the horror of the aliens to 11 as tobe takes the helm to give us a very wonderful spin upon the classic story of that orginal movie. The film focuses on David Gardner (Hunter Carson) a young boy who’s become convinced he’s seen a alien spaceship land in the sand pit behind his house which the cops do not believe as many others dont at frist as the case when people start changing to aliens we begin see them acting differntly then before. 

Blu-ray Review: Invaders From Mars (1986)

The remake stars Hunter Carson (son of filmmaker L.M. Kit Carson and actress Karen Black) as the boy, David Gardner, who begins to suspect something’s wrong with his folks when he sees his mom (Laraine Newman) consuming heavily salted raw hamburger, and his dad (Timothy Bottoms) swilling down scalding hot coffee laced with a fistful of saccharine tablets. When David notices his science teacher Mrs. McKeltch (Louise Fletcher) is even testier than usual, and that she’s sporting the same bandage on the back of her neck as his parents, he confesses his suspicions to the school nurse, Linda Magnusson (played by Black). Soon, the two of them are exploring an fantastic underground lair/spacecraft, populated by gangly, toothy creatures and a tentacled brain known as The Supreme Intelligence.

Invaders from Mars (1986) - Moria

Tobe Hooper’s Invaders From Mars is an anomaly among the 1980’s remakes of 1950’s B-Movie Horrors because it doesn’t attempt to make its source material frightening for a later era so much as it is interested in recreating the feeling of watching those films in the 50’s, with all the attendant creepiness and paranoia. Invaders From Mars uses the best available talent (Dan O’Bannon, John Dykstra and Stan Winston among them) to make an intentionally artificial out-of-time world, where everything seems not so much fake as it does made. This is a world not of our own, but made from and out of Sci-Fi Schlock of old. That Hooper turns around and makes the subtexural threat not communism but the return of 1950’s America, a return to rigid, bland conformity, a counter-revolution against the liberation movements of the 1960’s, the promised land of the Reagan Revolution as this movie as shows how the flaws of this era of idealism was such a flawed notion of returning back to this era. this is Hooper’s own response and follow-up to Poltergeist, a dark revisiting of the suburban nuclear family wherein the danger comes from both without and within, that it could infect your family, infect educational institutions, infect the military and the police, infect lines of communication, that it could infect you. That was what it felt like to be a kid in the 1980’s, where you could revolt into an uncaring void or attempt to hide and wait it out and hope that nuclear annihilation did not rain from the skies or get accidentally unleashed at home. Invaders From Mars, by really knowing and inhabiting the 1950’s Moviescape as this movie is simply a classic movie.

Mars Attacks! review(remake of invaders form mars as much making fun of those movies)

Mars Attacks! (1996)

Mars Attacks! is Tim Burton’s love letter to all of the b-movie sci-fi flicks that were littered throughout the fifties. Having already honored the cult filmmakers of the period with Ed Wood but this love letter is also in part a remake of invaders form mars but in a very modern way that is used to mock that notion in a way.  

Mars Attacks! (1996) - Rotten Tomatoes

One of those movies is Mars Attacks! This crazy invasion story is possible one of Burton’s underrated and unseen gems that literally owned my television back in the nineties. Starring a weird collection of stars, as you can imagine, it centres on, well, Mars attacking. Obviously centred mainly in America, this bobble headed aliens come to take over and Earth finds itself having to defend as the movie as much a love letter to the 1950’s b movie as much making fun of it.  Supposedly a parody of Alien invasion movies, Tim Burton’s insane spoof is much more than that, it’s an homage. Sending up the likes of It Came From Outer Space and more, Mars Attacks! sublimely tackles the visual inaccuracies of science fiction fare and blows them up on a larger scale. The comedy not only comes from the mockery, but from Burton’s crazed mind teaming with Jonathon Gems to create a film that works on its own hyperactivity, ballsiness, and dark humour that crafts out such a fun b-movie gem of its own. What’s more Burton added a star studded event and catapulted Mars Attacks! into this oddly surreal movie. A film that sees Pierce Brosnan, Jack Black, Sarah Jessica Parker, Danny DeVito, Martin Short, Natalie Portman. and many more all striving to survive this humanity ridding ghouls is ridiculous in itself. Not to mention that Jack Nicholson plays the President (and a sleazy rodeo business man in Last Vegas,) what more could you ask for? The cast is hilariously huge, which adds much to the spectacle. It’s more of a bonus that 99% of the characters are heinously unlikeable so watching them meet the impending doom is undeniably satisfying as i feel this b-movie classic should b watched upon repeat often upon the screen as i find joy watching this movie mock so many of the movies i adore watching often form the 1950’s as i hope you enjoyed my frist review of b-movie month.

Hitchcock’s ‘Vertigo’The Unrelenting gaze

Today I talk about Hitchcock’s ‘Vertigo which remains one of the greatest movies ever made. its is listed as the number one movie all time in hstory of flim.alfred Hitchcock’s VERTIGO is a movie that a film which functions on multiple levels simultaneously. One of the many movies that Hitchcock did in his lifetime was vertigo. It was not considered much of a masterpiece at the time. Vertigo is often considered Hitchcock’s most personal and emotional and complex of his movies that adresses many of the natures of what makes a great flim. Its today i am talking about it again for a talk. Lets begin. Hitchcock’s ‘Vertigo’The Unrelenting gaze

Hitchcock wanted to buy the rights to a novel called Celle qui n’etait plus (translated into English as She Who Was No More) by writers Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac, but unfortunately for him, director Henri-Georges Clouzot had beaten him to it and had directed the 1955 movie entitled Les Diaboliques based on said source material but he would twa,so when the follow-up D’entres les morts hit the bookstores in 1954, the director had Paramount commission a synopsis before the novel even got a chance to get translated into English. When the studio secured the rights, playwright Maxwell Anderson (Anne of the Thousand Days, The Bad Seed) got the job of adapting the novel into a film. Anderson wrote a script entitled Darkling, I Listen a quote from English poet John Keats’ poem Ode to a Nightingale—and Hitchcock did not like it one bit, so he discarded the draft and brought in Alec Coppel (The Captain’s Paradise, Mr. Denning Drives North) instead. Unfortunately, his second pick did not satisfy him either, leading to Samuel L. Taylor (Avantil, Sabrina) being hired to write the screenplay from scratch, with the help of Hitchcock’s notes. Taylor wanted to take sole credit for his work, but Coppel would not have it, and objected to the Screen Writers Guild, after which both were credited and Anderson was left out. Kim Novak was cast alongside Jimmy Stewart, although the part of the female lead was initially intended for Vera Miles, who would later on play her most memorable role in Psycho. Miles became pregnant so the director chose Novak instead. By the time the actress was ready to start shooting after having taken care of her other commitments; Miles became available again, only to find out that Hitchcock had decided to stick with his new leading lady as he would find this tale of obsession. Vertigo follows John “Scottie” Ferguson, a police officer who discovers he has a fear of heights that manifests itself as vertigo, forced to retire after his condition results in him having to retire from the police force. He spends time with his friends as one day asked by a friend to follow his wife wants his wife Madeleine (Kim Novak) followed, but not because he suspects her of infidelity­ but rather because he is afraid for her mental health as he becomes obsessed with this blond woman to the point of madness.

Vertigo works as this factuality of the unrelenting male gaze that dominates and dictates both our shared collective reality and the majority of the narratives we as a species create and willingly consumes our obsession of it. We see yet another hand to it too as the collective look upon how the male gaze n obsession can drive one to madness as this movie can be viewed as clever breakdown of the male gaze as the idea of how scottie’s obression with creatring this perfect image of a woman that is same as hitchcock’s own obression of the hitchcock blond. the trope of his flims as he has always this perfect blond woman that is perfect to look upon the screen upon her as you gaze upon her as you see her is the perfect woman to scotties own fears known as acrophobia as way hitchcock captures this image is so amazing. The viewpoint must be fixed you see, while the perspective is changed as by using the dolly and zoom simultaneously as effect captures fhe fears of scottie trough his gaze of his fears as he sees the heights as he stops n looks upon ground is able show us the fears of him  at that moment.

It is when judy becomes Becomes Madeleine we see her her change form judy to Madeleine we see the depths of madness of scottie as he is obresssed with this perfect woman. He has her even become this woman in his eyes to recreate her in his own image of this perfect woman. 

Vertigo has another collective layer upon it to watch as you see it unfold upon the screen as it is fascinating to watch Vertigo unfold for the first third of the film presents us with what seems like a ghost story about possession that dabbles in the subject of ancestral trauma that has a repeating pattern over n over again. It’s also the nature of this movie too as you can watch it over n again finding new things each time. Jimmy Stewart gives a terrific performance in the role of Scottie a man recognizing his own limits.  Bernard Herrmann’s musical score as the music is probably more important here than in most films, let alone most Hitchcock films as you see the music plays key part in setting the tone n moods of the scenes of this wonderful classic as the way you see the musical cues of the shifts of it as the gaze changes n moods changes n scenes changes it captures the movies collective tone of the gaze of our lead character upon the screen. Robert Burks Cinematography captures San Francisco as it richly captures the city in such richness and depth. There is color filter that does many tricks such the changing of colors on many scenes in a feverish way is part of this movie that mirrors the German Expressionist style. It’s only really an updated version of the superimposing of images and casting of shadows in films by Fritz Lang and FW Murnau that Hitchcock manages to capture psychological mood of a man that is driving to a point to find his own limits. Vertigo is a masterpiece with so many layers upon it but the one layer that shows throughout the movie is the gaze upon the screen.   Everything about this film truly is marvelous n layered with many different ways to look upon this movie as its one of best movies ever made upon the screen.

rear window

Today I talk about rear window which i review for The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon hosted by Maddy Loves Her Classic Films.  Rear window is one amazing thriller that is one of the best thrillers ever made. Hitchcock always crafts wonders so i will talk about another wonder done by Hitchcock today. I would also love to thank host and ask you check out other posts from this wonderful event as now to review this classic gem.

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rear window review(https://www.facebook.com/Wolffianclassicmoviesdigest/

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Hitchcock isn’t the master of tension without good reason as his direction in rear window of how Rear Window is one of the best instances of how Hitchcock builds tension as he manages to slowly over each scene build tension throughout the film.

Rear window is is one of Hitchcock’s finest tales which is an tale of voyeurism in miniature as every open window in the blistering apartment complex that Hitchcock’s camera resides in leads to another character, another emotion, another scene, and another mystery that you are set upon to figure out.

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James Stewart’s performance on the screen as Jeff is one of the finest acted on the screen. He emotes with such detailed movements that shows each of his expressions with his eyes and detailed movements that makes his  performance truly special to watch unfold on the screen. James Stewart delivers possibly a career best performance as the stir crazy invalid. Restricted to only minimal body movement as its truly one amazing performance you watch unfold on the screen.

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Thelma Ritter plays such a fine role upon the screen. Grace Kelly gives out such an amazing performance on the screen.  Beautiful Grace Kelly is outstanding as the lovely girlfriend who turns into an adventurous spy as she gets interested in his boyfriend’s new hobby as she gets into the troubles of the mystery with her boyfriend. She is so charming to watch unfold on the screen.

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You get the impression Hitchcock was a director that liked to be pushed and tested to his limits. From the early days of the cramped Lifeboat to the cleverly edited one-shot Rope, Hitchcock has enjoyed being technically restricted and challenged. Rear Window may have been filmed on the largest indoor soundstage at the time but he forced himself to remain tightly focused on the important elements of the story which was cleverly written by John Michael Hayes.

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Rear window is superbly directed by Hitchcock with great use of suspense, the film presents the director in complete control of his film-making wizardry that is so smartly crafted out with wonderful Cinematography by Robert barks and a wonderful musical score by Franz Waxman that all make this movie truly come to life upon the screen.

Rear Window is a wonderfully simple thriller that also flirts with comedy and drama. With the always active photographer, L.B. ‘Jeff’ Jefferies, confined to a wheelchair he is left with little to do but spy on his fellow neighbours across the courtyard. Jeff becomes a voyeur in the same way we do when we watch movies upon the screen. Rear Window is an undisputed masterpiece that you simply will adore to watch anytime.

The Ruth rating:

The Searchers

Today I talk about The Searchers which in terms of classical westerns really outshines many others of the genre. John Ford’s most compelling Western avoids  association with the genre’s established precepts. Its one of the best movies ever made for the screen as my review today looks upon this classic movie as i define this classic gem.

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In terms of classical storytelling The Searchers John Ford’s most compelling Western avoids many of the genre’s older traits. The film stars John Wayne, an actor eternally linked to Westerns, perhaps giving his best performance in any Ford film as he plays a very racist man that hates Indians with a passion in many ways you shouldn’t connect to this hero yet he is an interesting hero that is deeply flawed with so many diffrent sides to this man.

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By 1955 when production began on when production began, The Searchers would be Ford’s first Western in five years a personal risk after a number of commercial failures and artistic missteps caused him to contemplate retirement as he filmed what would be one of the finest westerns ever made. The Searchers comes naturally, as beyond its unequivocal beauty and dramatic intensity, there exists what appear to be incompatible narrative developments, symbolism, and thematic undercurrents signifying the end product that is something so profound upon the screen with amazing shots and an interesting character and story that unfolds upon the screen. When Edwards (John Wayne) returns home to Texas after the Civil War.

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When members of his brother’s family are killed or abducted by Comanches, he vows to track down his surviving relatives and bring them home. Eventually, Edwards gets word that his niece Debbie (Natalie Wood) is alive, and, along with her adopted brother, Martin Pawley (Jeffrey Hunter), he embarks on a dangerous mission to find her, journeying deep into Comanche territory.(plot form goggle) 

The Searchers sets up grim set of conditions, ranging from the landscape to individual character histories. The first iconic shot (mirrored by the film’s last iconic shot) of Martha opening the front door seems to frame the outer terrain like a photograph that shows us the vast landscape upon the screen. I would say many do hate this movie because its hatred towards Indians as the villain is common in many westerns.

A clue to Ethan’s hatred for Comanche Indians appears early in the film, when the younger Debbie goes to her hiding place before Scar first attacks in the film. He kneels down in the graveyard by a headstone, which, appearing for only a few frames, reads: “Here lies Mary Jane Edwards killed by Comanche’s May 12, 1852 A good wife and mother in her 41st year.” Sixteen years earlier, was Ethan’s own mother massacred by Comanche’s? He is a deeply flawed man on a quest to save a woman for years. It’s the quest of this man and his drive to save his family that really drives this hero to many points of rage that you see his hate come upon us and the dark humor used is often to tame down the ways of this dark hero characterizes the film’s fundamental struggle whether or not Ethan and Martin actually find Debbie is less the fear than what Ethan will do when he finds her.

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In the film’s most memorable scene, one of the greatest single moments of film, Ethan emerges from Scar’s tent on his horse and spots Debbie, who, dressed in full Comanche attire, runs in terror. Ethan chases her down a hill and corners her; Martin trailing behind yelling “No!” for Ethan not to do what he has intended to do from the outset. Ethan gets off his horse and picks Debbie up, raises her in the air like a child, the fear radiating from her. He lowers her into his arms, and says, “Let’s go home, Debbie. Ethan also is genuinely scary. His obsessiveness, his absolute hatred of Comanche’s and all Native Americans and his loneliness set him apart from any other characters Wayne played as its one of his finest with many layers to him making you wonder about him throughout the film.

John Ford was particularly proud of The Searchers, as was Wayne, who named his son Ethan after his character. The film’s initial critical reception, however, lacked passion, as did its box office receipts, and Ford was devastated by its apparent dismissal reputation at the time of its release.  The picture’s reputation would grow over time, earning recognition on top film lists as it is one of the finest movies made form this genre with marvelous acting by everyone in its cast and marvelous direction and the cinematography of The Searchers is one of films finest gems ever made upon the screen. It contains painterly images of majestic scenery, some of the most remarkable ever captured. Historians and film scholars attest to its supremacy and recognize its influence on the medium and the artists working therein. And yet, the motion picture Ford considered his own masterpiece confronts prior standards, meets issues of revenge and discrimination within a ponderous text, and revises the director’s Western model forevermore as its one of the finest movies ever crafted upon the screen. John Ford amends The Searchers from a traditional Hollywood Western into an uncommon human tragedy that makes this movie one of the finest classics you will ever see ever upon the screen that you should see today.

The Ruth rating:five bette's

NIGHT AND THE CITY

Today I talk about Night and the City. The night is tonight, tomorrow night…or any night. The city is London. Night and the City opens with an opening monologue with a voice talking about the city. The film’s opening narration, spoken by its director Jules Dassin in which i define as one of the finest noir classics all time.

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Night and the City: In the Labyrinth of the underworld.(https://www.facebook.com/Wolffianclassicmoviesdigest/)

The night is tonight, tomorrow night…or any night. The city is London. Night and the City opens with a opening monologue with a voice talking about the city. The film’s opening narration, spoken by its director Jules Dassin, recalls how filmmaker Carol Reed opened his picture in the same way. The Third Man (1949) opened like this film in many ways. This will not be last comparison to reed’s flim as both titles suggest parallel themes of realism and expressionism, both go about in it in diffrent ways. The title night in the city is hard poetry as as Andrew Pulver observed in his volume for the British Film Institute. To be sure that Dassin’s cinematographer Max Greene shoots rich street photography recalling that of Weegee.

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The locations range from flophouses to seamy flats, dive bars to alleyways. The familiar setting of London becomes a strange and unseemly environment as transforms the city into a sordid, alternate backdrop was a common theme in film noir another connection between Night and the City and The Third Man, which takes place in Vienna. Likewise, both films also use the crumbled post-World War II setting. It captures the underworld of the city which echoes the common connection of both movies of its theme.

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Dassin and Reed each harnesses the post world war II setting of the underworld setting of the destroyed cities in aftermath of the war they harnesses the reality of exposing horrendous crimes as both also have been masterfully crafted with chiaroscuro shadows and off-kilter angles, accentuating the undercurrent of darkness beneath the settings of a world in its darkest place after the end of the war as our world struggled with our darkness and sin.

When Kersh’s novel was released in 1946, producer Charles K. Feldman paid $45,000 for the film rights and hired former police reporter Jo Eisinger to write the script. Feldman had negotiated with Jacques Tourneur (Out of the Past, 1947) to direct it yet it failed to go trough to production. The production, including the book-to-film rights and Eisinger’s script, was sold to Zanuck at Fox as he did it as favor for Jules Dassin remarked, “Zanuck pushed this book in my hand, and said, ‘You’re leaving, you’re getting out of here. You’re going to London and you’re going to make this film knowing the director was a member of the Communist Party since 1939 it was chance for him to do something boldly new for the studio. However, if given a choice, Dassin later claimed he would not have fled to avoid giving testimony. Nevertheless, Night and the City would be Dassin’s last film shot in the United States until Uptight in 1968.  It’s a bleak and very dark look upon the city of London. I feel this movie is the definitive noir classic. Night and the City: In the Labyrinth by By Paul Arthur  

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At the heart of Night and the City is a master trope: the urban labyrinth. Cities in film noir are not simply dangerous or bristling with iconographic menace—they are visualized as death traps, spaces from which there can be no escape. This common pattern finds summary expression in Dassin’s film. Nearly every setting is crammed with architectural grids, frames, cul-de-sacs, narrow stairways, perspectives that choke off the mobility and freedom of human subjects (this is quoted form Night and the City: In the Labyrinth by Paul Arthur on the movie. I put link above too so you can read the wonderful essay that talks this flim) its one of the best noir classics all time in my eyes. Dassin’s status as an artist forced into isolation may have gained him, and Night and the City, sympathy after the film’s release but its well earned in my eyes as it is simply a marvelous movie.

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NIGHT AND THE CITY review

Night and the City, adapted from Gerald Kersh’s novel, is the supreme example of London noir. Its one of the finest noir classics ever produced for the screen. The writer who came up with the orginal novel was Gerald Kersh, attached it to his third novel. Published in 1938, Night and the City is a high-minded pulp thriller containing a fantastically vivid creation about the dark underbelly of a city. The city has been mankind’s booming hub for ages snice man started with cities in ancient times. They are dark seedy worlds with many layers to them. I would call night in city the prime example of what fine noir does at its finest explores the underbelly and city in a very shadowed light.
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Dassin’s well documented run and gun approach to shooting Night and the City is fully evident as the streets of London pop and fizzle under Dassin’s eye with an energy and fever akin to its underworld story. Its one of his finer noir classics that he crafted with such fine direction and craft. Image result for night and the city

The cinematography of Night and the City is remarkable with such fine details crafted by Mutz Greenbaum whom crafts out dripping alleyways with neon signs, walk-up flats, sweaty basement dives, and atmospheric streets. Greene shot them all with a combination of expert chiaroscuro and the fast-paced, documentary-style realism that really makes this noir classic a gem to behold upon the screen.

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This is by far one of Richard Widmark’s best performances. He’s a live wire from start to finish. We never see Harry Fabian rest, not even once, as he’s trying to make his dreams of being a big shot a reality as he gives out one of his finest hours on the screen. It has wonderful acting by everyone in its cast. Night-and-the-City-3

 The film’s centerpiece is a brutal impromptu wrestling match in Harry’s gym between The Strangler and Gregorius. Nobody can separate these two giant men and all Harry can do is watch and hope as his dreams of melding the classical and circus-like worlds of wrestling are dashed with every kidney punch and death grip attempt in this seedy classic.  

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This is by far one of the best crime stories I’ve ever seen. Dassin does an amazing job of ratcheting up the tension in every scene that makes it one of the finest noir movies I ever watched on the screen. You simply should see this classic movie today.

The Ruth rating:five bette's

In A Lonely Place.

In a Lonely Place

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Today I review In a Lonely Place which is a fine noir classic about Hollywood. Let us review this classic movie today.

In a Lonely Place review

Nicholas Ray’s in the lonely place presents us a very amazing noir classic about a Hollywood writer whose temper leads to accusations of murder and conflicted relationship. I would say this film stands among other Nicholas Ray classics such as they live by night and rebel without a cause and Johnny Guitar  and On dangerous ground. Martin Scorsese and Wim Wenders are among fans of his movies.

Humphrey Bogart’s performance in a Lonely Place. Humphrey Bogart shows what he capable in his skills as an actor to do on the screen. Humphrey Bogart plays Dixon Steele in his darkest role on the screen. He shows off his true darkness of his soul to give us his finest hour on the screen. Gloria Grahame plays her finest hour on screen as Laurel Gray whom is one dam amazing character on the screen. It plays to the under-rated nature of Gloria Grahame this role. It shows how this under-rated actress could do such amazing acting.

Humphrey Bogart  and Gloria Graham  have electrifying chemistry on screen together.

In A Lonely Place is a fabulous picture which was frankly never was nominated for any Oscars at all.

In A Lonely Place is told in two parts to its overall tale. The first part of the movie deals with Dixon Steele and his darker traits unfolding on screen.  We see the relationship of Dixon Steele and Laurel Gray unfolding on the screen. The movie becomes wilder and more intense as it changes gears into the second part of the tale. The second part of the tale is Laurel Gray’s tension filled moments unfold on the screen. Nicholas Ray merges both parts together dabs them with darkly affecting visuals to make one interesting movie. The black and white cinematography of this movie is truly amazing to see unfold on the screen. In the lonely place is true gem of movies that you will want to watch again and again.

 

The Ruth rating:five bette's

Today i reviewed n A Lonely Place  as it told a tale about a Hollywood screenwriter. Nicolas ray made such a an amazing classic movie that you will enjoy anytime to watch on the screen. I hope you enjoyed my review of this classic movie. I will return in the future for another review.