Invaders form mars

Invaders form mars review

William Cameron Menzies’ frightening portrayal of a Martian menace is blessed with his own fantastic production design, brilliantly weaving a world from a child’s perspective as this fun b-movie is fades form memory as i review this movie also the 1986 remake as also i do a modern remake of it with mar’s attacks all three movies really are the mar’s invading us idea given to us in each a differnt way as the 1950’s era was a ripe era for scfi b-movie as such given on on the Forbidden Planet DVD we see watch the skies which talks about how it was about the fears of the time. So i begin b-movie month with my frist b-movie review of this month.

Invaders From Mars (1953) | Sci-Fi Saturdays

Invaders from Mars has a simple setup, but is executed with such precision and strong performances that it goes above and beyond the expected alien invader scenario as the simple story is really such a deeper story beyond the core simple idea of aliens landing to invade our planet. a young boy named David. When he wakes the next day he notices that his father has a wound on his neck and is acting strange. After noticing the same mark on other townsfolk he realises that they’ve been taken over by Martians. He then has to try and convince the local authorities of his inherently outlandish tale and put a stop to the menacing Martians but its so much fun to watch it unfold on screen with such wonderful performances as we see it form a child’s outlook of the invasion of mars. It really plays on the fears of the 1950’s as we see this movie play upon the fear of the other which was a common idea for this era of movie. 

Low angles make adults appear as giants, while the mutant Martians seem even more imposing and a multitude of adept tracking shots bring the whole thing to vivid, alarming life, due in no small part to John F. Seitz’ wonderful cinematography. Even the production design becomes more nightmarish as it goes on (again by Menzies himself who had a long and successful career in that area with films like Gone With The Wind), where innocuous locations like the rooms of David’s house and the trees behind it gradually become more alien. It’s not just the alien menace or the humans in their control, the very world around him is threatening now. It’s that dreamlike quality that really sets Invaders From Mars apart. That unearthly green glow that bathes the Martian spaceship, the newly twisted and warped trees that surround it, the malevolent but ethereal sound design as the aliens capture new victims, it all feels like one big hallucination or nightmare, a hazy fever dream of the end of the world as this mvoie showcases some of the best of the b-movie of this era as its a fun classic you will enjoy so much to watch unfold on the screen.

Invaders From Mars (1986) remake review

Tobe Hooper’s Invaders from Mars is  A remake of William Cameron Menzies’ 1953 science-fiction/horror classic which was scary remake of it i might add as this movie really pumps up the horror of the aliens to 11 as tobe takes the helm to give us a very wonderful spin upon the classic story of that orginal movie. The film focuses on David Gardner (Hunter Carson) a young boy who’s become convinced he’s seen a alien spaceship land in the sand pit behind his house which the cops do not believe as many others dont at frist as the case when people start changing to aliens we begin see them acting differntly then before. 

Blu-ray Review: Invaders From Mars (1986)

The remake stars Hunter Carson (son of filmmaker L.M. Kit Carson and actress Karen Black) as the boy, David Gardner, who begins to suspect something’s wrong with his folks when he sees his mom (Laraine Newman) consuming heavily salted raw hamburger, and his dad (Timothy Bottoms) swilling down scalding hot coffee laced with a fistful of saccharine tablets. When David notices his science teacher Mrs. McKeltch (Louise Fletcher) is even testier than usual, and that she’s sporting the same bandage on the back of her neck as his parents, he confesses his suspicions to the school nurse, Linda Magnusson (played by Black). Soon, the two of them are exploring an fantastic underground lair/spacecraft, populated by gangly, toothy creatures and a tentacled brain known as The Supreme Intelligence.

Invaders from Mars (1986) - Moria

Tobe Hooper’s Invaders From Mars is an anomaly among the 1980’s remakes of 1950’s B-Movie Horrors because it doesn’t attempt to make its source material frightening for a later era so much as it is interested in recreating the feeling of watching those films in the 50’s, with all the attendant creepiness and paranoia. Invaders From Mars uses the best available talent (Dan O’Bannon, John Dykstra and Stan Winston among them) to make an intentionally artificial out-of-time world, where everything seems not so much fake as it does made. This is a world not of our own, but made from and out of Sci-Fi Schlock of old. That Hooper turns around and makes the subtexural threat not communism but the return of 1950’s America, a return to rigid, bland conformity, a counter-revolution against the liberation movements of the 1960’s, the promised land of the Reagan Revolution as this movie as shows how the flaws of this era of idealism was such a flawed notion of returning back to this era. this is Hooper’s own response and follow-up to Poltergeist, a dark revisiting of the suburban nuclear family wherein the danger comes from both without and within, that it could infect your family, infect educational institutions, infect the military and the police, infect lines of communication, that it could infect you. That was what it felt like to be a kid in the 1980’s, where you could revolt into an uncaring void or attempt to hide and wait it out and hope that nuclear annihilation did not rain from the skies or get accidentally unleashed at home. Invaders From Mars, by really knowing and inhabiting the 1950’s Moviescape as this movie is simply a classic movie.

Mars Attacks! review(remake of invaders form mars as much making fun of those movies)

Mars Attacks! (1996)

Mars Attacks! is Tim Burton’s love letter to all of the b-movie sci-fi flicks that were littered throughout the fifties. Having already honored the cult filmmakers of the period with Ed Wood but this love letter is also in part a remake of invaders form mars but in a very modern way that is used to mock that notion in a way.  

Mars Attacks! (1996) - Rotten Tomatoes

One of those movies is Mars Attacks! This crazy invasion story is possible one of Burton’s underrated and unseen gems that literally owned my television back in the nineties. Starring a weird collection of stars, as you can imagine, it centres on, well, Mars attacking. Obviously centred mainly in America, this bobble headed aliens come to take over and Earth finds itself having to defend as the movie as much a love letter to the 1950’s b movie as much making fun of it.  Supposedly a parody of Alien invasion movies, Tim Burton’s insane spoof is much more than that, it’s an homage. Sending up the likes of It Came From Outer Space and more, Mars Attacks! sublimely tackles the visual inaccuracies of science fiction fare and blows them up on a larger scale. The comedy not only comes from the mockery, but from Burton’s crazed mind teaming with Jonathon Gems to create a film that works on its own hyperactivity, ballsiness, and dark humour that crafts out such a fun b-movie gem of its own. What’s more Burton added a star studded event and catapulted Mars Attacks! into this oddly surreal movie. A film that sees Pierce Brosnan, Jack Black, Sarah Jessica Parker, Danny DeVito, Martin Short, Natalie Portman. and many more all striving to survive this humanity ridding ghouls is ridiculous in itself. Not to mention that Jack Nicholson plays the President (and a sleazy rodeo business man in Last Vegas,) what more could you ask for? The cast is hilariously huge, which adds much to the spectacle. It’s more of a bonus that 99% of the characters are heinously unlikeable so watching them meet the impending doom is undeniably satisfying as i feel this b-movie classic should b watched upon repeat often upon the screen as i find joy watching this movie mock so many of the movies i adore watching often form the 1950’s as i hope you enjoyed my frist review of b-movie month.

Face-Hugging Dreams of Breathing: Ridley Scott’s ‘Alien

Face-Hugging Dreams of Breathing: Ridley Scott’s ‘Alien

Visionary and terrifying, Ridley Scott’s Alien hybridized the horror and science-fiction genres in 1979 to effectively launch a new subgenre, and countless clones have since borrowed from its DNA. Space-aged operatics and laser battles have no place in this imaginatively designed film, whose mounting tension still contains fearsome intensity and whose visual ambitions still evoke awe. Scott’s artistry still amazes us even some 41 years later as this year as you see this movie showcases a new style of scfi flim that would be copied by so many movies.

H.R. Giger’s alien design’s in alien really showcase many of alien movie’s amazing style and look for its dark and creepy world. Of course, Alien was not the first film about a killer creature from space, nor was it the first haunted house-type story in which characters are hunted down and systematically slaughtered, nor would it be the last. Screenwriter Dan O’Bannon later admitted, “I didn’t steal Alien from anybody. I stole it from everybody!” From the radio beacon of unknown origin in Forbidden Planet (1956) to the escalating alien scares in It! The Terror from Beyond Space (1958) to the claustrophobic setting of The Thing from Another World (1951), the film is not without its influences all would make this classic gem into something that takes form past of movies yet setups dna for future movies. 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Floating in the silence of space, inside the Nostromo lights flicker on and computers scroll incoming transmissions. The crew of seven is awakened from their hyper-sleep as many of the shots of this movie is shot so wonderfully by scott’s wonderful handy cam work that captures dark and creepy world of alien. Scott’s technique lends Alien distinction amid its respective genres at the time; rather than have the alien leap at the viewer from the start, he builds suspense through a meticulously controlled intensification of anxiety. Take the sound design and the careful juxtaposition of agonizing, dominating silence and jarring bursts of audible terror. The Nostromo’s crew moves about the quiet ship in virtual silence, their dialogue limited at first. 

Scott’s technique lends Alien distinction amid its respective genres at the time; rather than have the alien leap at the viewer from the start, he builds suspense through a meticulously controlled intensification of anxiety.Scott’s moody treatment of the plot is counterbalanced by his talented ensemble, who gives the film an unmistakable human dimension in the coldness of space. Wage slaves all, the Nostromo’s crewmembers behave like interstellar working stiffs, led by their mellow captain, Dallas (Tom Skerritt). Second in command is the good-humored Kane (John Hurt), host to the alien organism. Next in line is warrant officer Ripley, who tries to quarantine Kane, but her adherence to protocol is defied by the icy science officer, Ash (Ian Holm), who allows Kane onboard. On the sidelines and informing the audience’s reactions are edgy navigator Lambert (Veronica Cartwright), and maintenance men Parker (Yaphet Kotto) and Brett (Harry Dean Stanton), who quibble tirelessly about getting paid less than their fellow crew members. Most impressive is that the youngest actor among them is Cartwright at 29. If Alien were made today by another filmmaker, it may have been populated by the time’s youngest and hottest stars. Scott’s intention, however, was to find a cast that could bring natural performances to an unnatural setting.

Beyond the excruciating tension, what remains so haunting about the film is how little it tells us about the alien, its origins, life cycle, and even its physical makeup. Its metamorphosis from parasite Facehugger to embryo Chestbuster to predatory Alien attacks its victims on multiple levels. In one way, it acts like a disease, invading the body and destroying from within. In another very suggestive way, it penetrates the body both in its parasitic and predatory forms. As Ash observes, “A perfect organism of steer horror that really will scare you as the alien is a creepy monster of terror as its lack of humanity it envokes anytime on the screen. The way the Facehugger implants its embryo recalls ichneumon wasps who lay their eggs on or inside their prey, while the alien’s tongue-like Pharyngeal jaws emerge from its mouth and call to mind a Moray eel that invokes many of the artwork of iger’s original illustrations to the screen in such a surreal and creepy manner.

the producers’ original decision to cast Cartwright as Ripley. This last-minute choice became a fateful one for Weaver, whose career has been long-associated with the Alien franchise, having appeared in four entries through 1997. More significantly, though, Weaver’s initial presence as an iron-willed heroine afforded audiences a tough and noble hero, whose femininity was downplayed but not altogether absent. For decades, Weaver would be the only actress in Hollywood who could headline an action film, while her dramatic and genre work remained steady: she played an ironic damsel in the Ghostbusters series, earned two Oscar nominations in 1988 playing Dian Fossey in Gorillas in the Mist and a relentless business executive in Working Girl, explored arthouse drama with Roman Polanski’s Death and the Maiden (1997) and Ang Lee’s The Ice Storm (1997), and remains forever linked to the science-fiction and horror genres since this breakthrough performance. One of the great pleasures of watching Alien is witnessing Weaver grow into a star right before our eyes as she gives out such a marvelous performance as such of her performance is a breakout in this movie.

Much has changed about the science-fiction and horror genres in the thirty years since Alien’s release as a flim like alien would be revealing so many details earlier as also cast younger stars to play the key roles in its wonderful cast. Alien is a profoundly influential work and a lasting classic. The risks taken by this film make it a rarity, while its methods yield a paradigmatic specimen whose combination of genre thrills, bound by great artistry and innovation, have yet to be bested by imitators that still lasts the test of time. 

Escape to Witch Mountain

Today I talk about the Escape to Witch Mountain being huge Disney fan been watching like crazy many things on Disney plus getting new movies to review even modern to tackle as new modern classics as I decided take a long break form blogging to find stuff of interest to review. Disney live action movies can be hit or miss as this movie is one of those classics that I feel is timeless n enchanting matching the power of its animated classics. So let’s review this classic gem now.

escape to witch mountain review(https://www.facebook.com/Wolffianclassicmoviesdigest/)Based on Alexander Key’s 1969 novel of the same name, Escape to Witch Mountain was theatrically released on March 21, 1975. The live action flick is 97 minutes in length as this Disney flim filled with paranormal activity, two orphans, Dr. Loomis from Halloween, and Ali Hakim from Oklahoma!. What type of film can this possibly be? Well, it’s the 1975 film, Escape to Witch Mountain its something of a gem in the rough patch years of Disney of the 1970’s n 1980’s before the rebirth with little mermaid as this movie is so dam good. you will enjoy n delight upon it.

Walt Disney showed great interest in live Acton movies in the as he was prime in crafting n creating 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea which had an amazing cast of stars such as Kirk Douglas  and Jame Manson among others as this movie has same thing of such amazing casting by Disney studios. I recently watched the Witch Mountain movies off Disney plus as both has such wonderful casts. Tony (Ike Eisenmann) and Tia Malone (Kim Richards) and Aristotle Bolt (Ray Milland),they escape  with the help of Jason O’Day (Eddie Albert) all of these wonderful stars give out a wonderful perfomance that simply will charm you insantly.  I would say that Ray Milland maybe gives out one of his most wonderful hour. He delights as a villain that is simply one of best Disney live action villains to my eyes 

One scene you see nod to snow white is playing upon the screen as its also a nod to Disney’s bold start as movie giant. Its a fun chase movie that maybe shows you that if smartly written n directed n cast that make you have such fun with this delightfully charming Disney movie that also count as such a fun adventure to behold on the screen. 

The best effects, opening sequence, and a weird atmosphere that seems like Disney fantasy-mystery-thriller-adventure, with its psychic imagery and high fantasy blend, the mystery it builds with a wonderful blend of scfi like close encounters  made for kids in style as one of coolest scenes in any movie of this period as has a flying RV that makes for such fun. Puppets, telepathy, bears, Donald Pleasance all really make also among such things that is fun about this movie as i watched it on Disney plus i watched follow up which only saving grace was hammed in performance by bette Davis whom was just collecting a paycheck as the role felt lesser to her. I really adored both in some ways they both show you how Disney tried hard recapture their magical charm in an era of such lesser Disney flims that kept making them lesser as a company

I know I’ll be watching Return from Witch Mountain soon again as likely often as this wonderful classic that simply is wonderful classic that i am glad Disney plus added to their vaults among its follow up. here’s to hoping Disney+ adds some of their spookier treats like Watcher in the Woods and Something Wicked this Way Comes as I would die to see them both next as this classic you should watch streaming or buy copy as anyway you choose watch it as watch this delightful classic today folks. I hope you enjoyed my movie review today that is return to finding new delights in movies I will review a movie soon.

Reign of Destruction

Reign of Destruction

Gojira, known in the West as Godzilla, first thundered into Japan’s movie houses on November 3, 1954. Six and a half decades later, the monster presides over an international entertainment franchise, having starred in thirty-two feature films produced in Japan and three (so far) in Hollywood, and top-lining three anime features, two animated television series, comic books, TV commercials, and more. Godzilla has transformed over time from powerful atomic allegory to children’s superhero and back again, and with the dawn in 2019 of the Reiwa era, the monster’s career spans the reigns of three Japanese emperors: Hirohito, Akihito, and now Naruhito. But it is the Godzilla films made during Showa (1926–89), the era denoting the reign of Emperor Hirohito, Japan’s wartime ruler and postwar figurehead, that defined the kaiju eiga—the uniquely Japanese brand of giant-monster cinema—and the creature-on-the-loose parameters of Godzilla filmdom. Bookended by Ishiro Honda’s 1954 masterpiece, Godzilla, and Honda’s last movie, Terror of Mechagodzilla (1975), the fifteen Showa-era films took Godzilla far and wide, with many of them playing theatrically not only in Japan but also across North America, Europe, Latin America, and other territories, before going into television syndication for many years, establishing Godzilla as an enduring icon that still endures today as today I talk about this legend today.

Image result for godzilla 1954I was little boy when I first learned of Godzilla as me n my younger brother used adore watching them together as he was huge fan of them. I am a huge fan of ’m a big fan of Godzilla, and of kaiju movies in general since my first time seeing the Godzilla movies as a child as now I simply adore these fun little gems of popcorn movie that is something to enjoy to watch anytime. I can remember watching on my TV these poorly dubbed movies that were simply fun to watch anytime upon the screen.

 

The original Godzilla is Honda’s lament for the nuclear age. The original Godzilla was produced amid a months-long public crisis that occurred after fishermen aboard a tuna boat christened the Daigo Fukuryu Maru (Lucky Dragon No. 5) unwittingly strayed dangerously close to a U.S. hydrogen-bomb test at Bikini Atoll in the South Pacific in March 1954 as also to address feelings of Japan at time. The lucky dragon incident seriously strained U.S.-Japan relations for the first time since the postwar occupation had ended in 1952; many citizens likened the fishermen’s fate to a third nuclear strike on Japan, and a national protest calling for a ban on nuclear testing arose among those in Japan. Honda’s film hints at these tensions: the opening scene, in which Godzilla invisibly attacks a salvage ship, is an unmistakable reference to the Lucky Dragon and the fear it inspired among people in Japan. 

Godzilla is also a Cold War movie with an awareness of Japan’s geographic entrapment between two superpowers engaged in a deadly arms race as Honda does not point the finger at the U.S. for having awakened the monster with its H-bomb tests as its about the brewing nuclear arm race of cold war as shows also Japan inserting its own place in world again after the second world war. The Godzilla movies of the sixties show evidence of Japan’s continuing economic growth as they show Japan’s rise again as player on world stage.  It’s a very wonderful film that I think anyone should anytime.

The first series of Godzilla films is the one which saw the franchise’s greatest metamorphosis from grimly serious allegory of atomic devastation to a happy-go-lucky monster who defends Earth, and even teaches his son how to stop bullies as each film shows a change form film to film in its tone of each movie in the series. The movies were my entry into the world of keiju-eiga cinema as my favorite era of him as i adore them all so much. This series includes “Gojira” (aka “Godzilla: King of the Monsters”, 1954), “Godzilla Raids Again” (aka “Gigantis: The Fire Monster”, 1955), “King Kong vs. Godzilla” (1962), “Mothra vs. Godzilla” (1964), “Ghidorah: The Three-Headed Monster” (1964), “Invasion of Astro-Monster” (aka “Godzilla vs. Monster Zero” (1965), “Ebirah, Horror of the Deep” (aka “Godzilla vs. the Sea Monster” 1966), “Son of Godzilla” (1967), “Destroy All Monsters” (1968), “All Monsters Attack” (aka “Godzilla’s Revenge”, 1969), “Godzilla vs. Hedorah” (aka “Godzilla vs. the Smog Monster” 1971), “Godzilla vs. Gigan” (aka “Godzilla on Monster Island”, 1972), “Godzilla vs. Megalon” (1973), “Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla” (aka “Godzilla vs. the Cosmic Monster” 1974), and “Terror of Mechagodzilla” (aka “Revenge of Mechagodzilla”, 1975). 

series favorites

“King Kong vs. Godzilla” (1962) as Godzilla had already fought another monster (“Barugan”) in the previous movie (“Godzilla Raids Again”), but this one is more fondly remembered due to the pairing of two iconic international monsters that made it one of iconic of the movies of series as one of my favorites of series. It’s something such fun to watch this movie. It’s a pure popcorn fun movie. 

“Destroy All Monsters” (1968).


It is Arguably the best of the later Showa series with a colorful assortment of monsters (old & new), a colorful ‘future’ setting of 1999, a moonbase (shades of 1975’s later “Space: 1999”), an alien conspiracy, and the first G-film to feature “Monster Island as simply the endgame of series as such wonderful fun to watch it from start to finish. 

“Gojira” (1954).

it is Still the best of the Godzilla movies As tonally different from subsequent Godzilla movies as possible as its as darker, somber, and very adult with themes that make it one of best of whole era of the series as its issues still key to date today in this wonderful classic gem.

 

This is a movie franchise that has shadowed me throughout my life, from watching them form the videotapes as boy to now as i simply adore these wonderful classics. Many of the films are admittedly cheesy and laughable (see: Mystery Science Theater 3000’s brilliant skewering of “Godzilla vs. Megalon”), but even those films still possess a goofy charm about them that is hard to deny as they are such fun movies. Godzilla is Monster, guardian, savior and icon as he has been all of these things at one time or another, often within the same film as he is the icon that I think will last ages to come as today’s talk by me was form my heart about this wonderful icon.

westworld:Deprogramming the future

 

vh6wvypcfx1cp2daetae

Westworld Had a Really Dark View of What theme-parks were like as its view caused a drop in people at Disneyland. It also had dark view of humanity.  today i talk about this cult classic and the TV show n its respective follow ups about how westworld addresses the bleak future of our world n how tech can really be something evil. so i can talk about it today.

Westworld, set in the American West in the mid-to-late nineteenth century, tells the story of a futuristic amusement park where many of the “cast members” (to borrow a term of Disney-world parlance) are not human, but rather humanoid robots as we see the scary bleak idea of how the future we will have these robots that we don’t trust as these creations can be seen as mirroring those found in theme-parks such as Disney-land. This parallel with Disney, however, can be pushed further. In the 1950s, America was the model nation for the West in a postwar world and Walt Disney became one of its chief emissaries. The park’s creator wanted to imagine a realm of dreams and fantasy. It was the public face of what would become a multibillion dollar corporation and culture-making machine. In the 1970s, the creation of Disneyworld went even further; the decision to open it part of Walt Disney’s desire for full control over his creation (something he lacked in the crowded space of Anaheim). Over time, the multiple parks in the Disney Empire, perhaps not dissimilar to the many different parts of west-world. Re-watching the movie now you would consider it dated but even as TV showed us that we can’t trust these ai in theme-parks how we to know if they can go crazy on us.

 

 

Parallels between humans and androids without actually saying as they simply are life-like robots that even die when shot like real humans. When the androids malfunction, they’re brought to a repair shop. But it’s not made up to look like some futuristic engineering space as repaired then brought to life. Although the death in Medieval World is the moment the humans in charge of Delos lose control, the real tipping point of the movie is when the humans decide to keep guests in a park they know is malfunctioning as the people running care less about safety then anything. Westworld’s world is a reality is shaped by our world’s view on f consumerism which show n other movies expand upon this notion. the worlds that Delos made in the tv show really show things changed from movie version in some ways with new layers building on top of the older ones like sediment in a geology of consumerism that really is scary in way.  It is  why many feared when movie released to go to Disney-land.

The Gunslinger feels like a Terminator more than anything else. but he also feels as human as the living humans in the film, including the West World guests that paid money to kill him over and over again along with many others in this world as made for humans to kill before they go crazy on us. It does also show the dark n grim reality of humanity we are always wanting control over everything as it also mirrors the control Walt wanted over this theme-parks. Writer and director Michael Crichton created an amazign idea that would later have other movie versions of this notion such as, Futureworld (1976), and a short-lived television series, Beyond Westworld (1980).and the TV show n Jurassic Park as the notion giving in Jurassic Park is controlling of dinosaurs as recreating wild-life for public show in a theme-park does address the nature of fear of these places to some as we may be able show you things in these theme-parks that are cool but they can be also scary as we can risk abusing that power too. Westworld’s anachronistic frontier becomes a space of emotional and psychological rebirth for wealthy patrons and park staff as does in many of his other works too this theme can be scary or a good thing as looking upon this today i reflected upon this movie as its a great movie n its follow up movies such as Futureworld (1976), and a short-lived television series, Beyond Westworld (1980).and the TV show n Jurassic Park all are wonderful i hope it does show you an outlook of the things in ways you never seen before. I hope you enjoyed this talk today.

doctor who:the hammer era

Today I talk about doctor who today which as I am a huge whovian that loves many things doctor who. The Gothic horror era of doctor who that was the fourth doctor’s aka tom baker’s classic stories are what I talk about today as I talk about the wonderful tom baker doctor who era of doctor who today. Let’s begin our adventure in time and space now.

doctor who:the hammer era(https://www.facebook.com/Wolffianclassicmoviesdigest/

When Philip Hinchcliffe was producer, Tom Baker played the Doctor with an aura of gleeful, natural eccentricity, giving way to bursts of morose introspection and bouts of unsettling behavior as also a trait of that era of tom baker was the Gothic classic doctor who stories.

Image result for THE BRAIN OF MORBIUS

Pyramids Of Mars reviewImage result for Pyramids Of Mars

Doctor who: pyramid of Mars is one of the top Doctor who stories of all time in many ways it’s the classic story of the doctor. Pyramids of Mars is a classic slice of doctor who with all the right ingredients that makes this story one of a kind that is likely one of the best of the Philip Hinchcliffe era of doctor who. Tom Baker is giving out one amazing performance as the doctor. Sarah Jane gives out one amazing performance in her role as she is the doctor who companions all adore forever. Pyramids of Mars is the perfect storm of story-telling with classic hammer horror elements that make this era something truly special as it’s so enjoyable to watch unfold on the screen.

Image result for doctor-who-pyramids-of-mars mummy

Pyramids of Mars continues the Hinchcliffe trend of tapping into a particular vein of horror and dropping the Doctor into a familiarly creepy plot that is a trait of this era of doctor who. Pyramids of Mars builds on the fascination with Egyptology. The pyramids had obviously been a pop culture fixation since the explorers first opened the tombs. It is how we ended up with many of the classic horror movies such as the mummy and hammer’s the mummy among other classic mummy horror movies. Pyramids of Mars gets a nice direct link to Hammer in Bernard Archer, playing Marcus Scarman, who appeared in The Horror of Frankenstein another hammer classic which i would say inspired another classic story of this era of doctor who. Its a very fun Gothic horror classic doctor who story with such wonderful acting that really you will enjoy to watch.

Image result for pyramids on mars doctor who

Doctor who: Pyramids of Mars is a great serial that I feel manages to capture all of the best traits of this era of doctor who as its one you should watch today.

Image result for doctor who Philip Hinchcliffe

Doctor Who: The Brain of Morbius review

Related image

The Brain of Morbius continues the trend of phenomenally strong episodes in Baker’s sophomore season of the show. Producer Philip Hinchcliffe continues his gothic adventures that are so inspired by Gothic horror and classic horror movies such as hammer horror.

Image result for Doctor Who: The Brain of Morbius

The Brain of Morbius channels the horrors of Frankenstein not the book but the classic universal horror movies in which a mad scientist in Solon; a grotesque medical experiment to construct a body from “spare parts. Hinchcliffe did not have a large budget to work with on this serial yet it’s so good looking and wonderful looking anyway as it looks like a horror movie set on the screen which makes them seem so much better upon the screen. The serial has such wonderful production design that really evokes a creepy classic horror movie feel to its world.

The serial’s superb production design, I even like the brain in the jar it reminds me a lot of Star Trek but with more sinister undertones that makes you really feel chills as you watch it. the collaborative script and Baker’s performance as the doctor really shines here as baker’s wit is under control but still playing the clown but he plays it softly in this tale as he gives out one of his finer performances as also so does Elisabeth Sladen as Sarah Jane whom gives out a fine performance as Sarah Jane.

The Brain of Morbius works because it’s just a very well put together example of Gothic horror that captures all the classical elements that makes that horror shine in every way.  It’s easy to see why this era of the series is treated so fondly. It’s just really good tea-time telly as it’s such a good serial to watch unfold on the screen.

Image result for Doctor Who tom baker and sarah jane

Doctor Who: The Seeds of Doom ReviewImage result for Doctor Who: The Seeds of Doom

The Seeds of Doom is one of several six-part series finales that the Tom Baker era that was later with Invasion of Time and The Armageddon Factor as both of later two are not as good as this one to my eyes.  The entire plot has more than a slight resemblance to Invasion of the Body Snatchers with plant spores in place of aliens taking over bodies as its alien plant over taking over bodies as same plot as that classic movie.

The two-part prologue set in the Arctic tundra calls to mind the classic science-fiction B-movie The Thing from another World with a polar research crew unearthing a potentially deadly alien entombed in ice. It works so well that it actually got me thinking of The Thing, John Carpenter’s celebrated remake.

The story feels like it owes a fairly heavy debt to The Avengers, or even James Bond, thanks in no small part to a wonderful villainous performance from Tony Beckley as he gives out one fine performance. His obsessive fascination with plants recalls the insane Hugo Drax from Roger Moore’s Moonraker as in many villains he is met by end by the very thing he loves in the end. Chase and Scorby are by no means the only humans ever to antagonize the Doctor. The series has had the character face off against very human villains with some regularity over the years. However, Chase and Scorby stand out as perhaps the most effective human bad guys since the Patrick Troughton era of doctor who.

It’s interesting that the serial features the Doctor subcontracting to UNIT once again. This would represent the last appearance of the group in the series until a brief appearance in The Five Doctors,one of the defining attributes of Baker’s Doctor was the way he seemed to literally flee the group as he barely ever helped unit. 

The special effects are pretty impressive. Yes, the wandering Krynoid in its early stages is very clearly just a guy in a silly suit but many of the effects look amazing such as nitial pod special effects look great, as do the initial stages of transformation as they all are some of best of the classic era of doctor who. Tom baker gives out one fine performance in this serial as does Elisabeth Sladen as Sarah Jane whom gives out a fine performance as Sarah Jane.

The Seeds of Doom works so very well is because it captures a lot of different aspects of the show demonstrating that while gothic horror was a strong part of the Hinchcliffe era as it does capture many other classic doctor who  traits that make this serial truly shine with wonderful acting and some wonderful effects. You should watch this classic serial today.

Elisabeth Sladen as sarah jane always remains one of the finest compaions of doctor who.She was the doctor’s best friend as she always gave out her best roles in doctor who stories upon the screen. It will always be the doctor and Sarah Jane. We will never forget her as its always the doctor and Sarah Jane. I hope you enjoyed my talk on doctor who today.

Image result for doctor who and sarah jane smith

Flash Gordon

Today I talk about Flash Gordon for the Outer Space on Film blogathon today. I am paying tribute to Flash Gordon which is one of my favorite serials all time to watch and re-watch often as its inspired many movies including star wars. I really adore classic Science Fiction serials and classic movies of that genre that all shine so brightly on the screen.

I hope you enjoy this tribute to flash Gordon for the Flash Gordon for the Outer Space on Film blogathon as always do check out other posts form the event today. Let’s begin our adventure into space now.

Flash Gordon serials introduction talk 

Flash Gordon is often called one of the cheesiest shows all time by so many people that often dismiss the amazing levels of depth beyond this series. It is cheesy at times the series but the series is embracing pulp Science Fiction tales that shaped the genre of Science Fiction. Flash Gordon serials were based upon the Flash Gordon comic strip which was created to compete with the already established Buck Rogers adventure strip which happens to be another serial that inspired star wars. Flash Gordon is directly inspired by John Carter of Mars which was what they wanted originally to make the strip based upon but ended up with Flash Gordon. The Flash Gordon comic strip has been translated into a wide variety of media, including motion pictures, television and animated series as today I am talking about the serials it’s such a joy to talk the classic serial flash gordon today.

Image result for Flash Gordon serials

Flash Gordon serials review

Image result for Flash Gordon serials

Flash Gordon begins with the strange planet Mongo hurtling towards Earth on a collision course. People across the world, from London to darkest Africa, are panicking as their seemingly certain doom draws near. One of the doomed Earthlings, polo player and all-around athlete Flash Gordon as it begins its story(plot intro form web)

Flash Gordon is probably the most popular and certainly the best known of all movie serials all time. Flash Gordon has wonderful sets and performances and creatures and unabashedly emotional moments to make it one of the most enduring serials of all time.

The cinematography of Flash Gordon further augments the serial’s atmosphere with some strikingly stylish camera angles that capture the action as one example is  flash’s fight with the “monkey-men” in the first chapter. The cinematography of this serial really captures such marvelous moments of action upon the screen.  I would say some moments it captures is so much fun to watch unfold on the screen and wonderfully captured on the screen by Frederick Stephani whom crafted out remarkable moments upon the screen.

One should not forget that The director Stephani and the more experienced Basil Dickey, George Plympton, and Ella O’Neill all really deserves credit for the wonderful things in the serials dialogue. Its cheesy at times some of the lines for our time today but you can always enjoy them if taking in context of time period.

Many serials divide the villainy between a brain and villains and action heavy it features a heroic team that one could say the main hero that does most of the action of the series which i feel unfolds upon the screen with such marvelous action upon the screen.

Jean Rogers’ Dale Arden is a pleasure to watch; her stunning beauty has never been seen to better advantage as her acting is also excellent, particularly in her reactions to the bizarre terrors of Mongo; critics have always seemed compelled to make silly comments about her propensity to scream and faint in times of danger or emotional stress but she is marvelous to watch upon the screen. Priscilla Lawson is also very good as Ming’s daughter that gives out such a marvelous job upon the screen. Richard Alexander has one of the most unusual roles of his career as Prince Barin, the rightful heir to the throne of Mongo who allies with Flash against the usurping Ming handles his archetype so well. He is simply marvelous in his performances on the screen. I would say its acting is Flash Gordon’s strongest suit along with its action and other wonderful elements to make this classic serial really come to life upon the screen.

Flash Gordon represents a near-perfect convergence of superior production values, imaginative scripting, and strong acting make this serial one truly classic serial series that one should see today.

The Ruth rating:five bette's

Image result for flash gordon serial

I would love to express my great joy today that I got to talk about Flash Gordon today. I am happy I got to talk about these marvelous serial classics. I felt such joy to talk this serial classic today for the Outer Space on Film blogathon.  I would love to thank everyone i hope you return next time for another magical review soon.

the time machine

the time machine(https://www.facebook.com/Wolffianclassicmoviesdigest)

So today I talk about the time machine. The time machine is directed by George Pal who directed some of my favorite movies all time. I loved stories of adventure and fantasy as a boy. George Pal movies are prime examples of this kind of story that I adored so much as a boy. The Time Machine may one of the greatest Science Fiction movies ever made for the screen. I review this classic movie now for my blog.

the time machine review

George Pal brought to fruition a visionary concept for a film based on a the time machine which was written by H.G. Wells years before. Rod Taylor passed away just four days shy of his 85th birthday with close to 60 films credits, his last performance was as Winston Churchill in Inglorious Bustards. He began with the movies the birds directed by Hitchcock. This movie may be Rod Taylor’s finest hour on the screen. The story is brilliantly told on screen with such wonderful special effects. Director George Pal crafted out an amazing classic that will delight you anytime to watch unfold on the screen. The Morlocks aren’t really evil as they are products of their age and time period that are truly scary to watch on the screen.

The Time Machine has such wonderful creature designs. It has the best creature designs of that era of films. We always ask one another if we would go back or forth in time if having the option giving in the time machine but we would likely not really want to risk the trouble as we know the effects can be worst then we think to travel back in time. The time machine as this is a great adaptation of the excellent novel. George Pal has shown us that it is wonderful characters and story that makes a movie magical to watch unfold on the screen. Nicholas Meyers achieved the same type of success years later with the film Time After Time with a time travel movie that is done with same effect as this wonderful classic you should see today.

The Ruth rating:five bette's

I hope you enjoyed my talk about the time machine  today which frankly is one amazing classic gem that i simply adored to talk about today.see you next time for another classic review soon.